International Stem Cell Corp. (ISCO) Stands to Benefit from a German Court Decision

International Stem Cell Corp., a biotech company specializing in the therapeutic applications of human parthenogenetic stem cells (hpSCs) and the development and commercialization of cell-based research and cosmetic products, today told investors of the recent decision by the German Federal Court of Justice, in the Greenpeace vs Brüstle patent case, which may allow the company to take a leading position in the European market.

This important ruling strengthens ISCO’s position that parthenogenetic technology may be an acceptable method of producing banks of human pluripotent stem cell (hpSC) lines and derivatives for the commercial therapeutic markets in Europe. As a result of the German court’s decision, patent restrictions will remain on other stem cell technologies, including embryonic stem cells, that require the destruction of human embryos. ISCO noted that the ruling is especially timely in light of its recent announcement of the creation of new clinical grade human parthenogenetic stem cell lines in the United States.

Leading stem cell biologist Professor Albrecht Müller of the Center for Experimental Molecular Medicine, University of Würzburg, Germany, commented, “Being able to patent cells and cell products is key to building a successful stem cell based biotechnology industry in Europe. We have already shown that hpSCs have tremendous potential to treat neurological diseases, and this new ruling makes hpSC and their derivatives significantly more attractive for the European market.”

Dr. Andrey Semechkin, CEO and Co-Chairman of ISCO, added, “This ruling may provide ISCO with a distinct advantage in being able to receive patent protection in the European Union. However, because Europe’s highest court, the European Court of Justice, may re-evaluate earlier guidelines based on this resolution, there may be further changes. Nevertheless, it is clear that this decision indicates that European courts are focusing on fertilization as a factor when considering the patentability of stem cell derived products.”

For more information on ISCO and its stem cell technologies, visit www.internationalstemcell.com

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